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But the diagonal position, the first example above, feels more natural to me...it is less formal somehow ...


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> Nevertheless it is fun to discuss spellings 

Yes - I agree!

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> I am preparing some documents to get feedback from my deaf students about horizontal versus vertical writing. You know that at school I ask my students to write the translation directly beneath the signwriting line. So it makes sense to write from left to write. But if it comes down just to rad a story it may be a difference .. I am interested to get more insight ...

That does sound fascinating - tell us what you learn!

Val ;-)


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> Stefan ;-)
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> Von: SignWriting List: Read and Write Sign Languages [mailto:[log in to unmask]] Im Auftrag von Valerie Sutton
> Gesendet: Donnerstag, 2. Dezember 2010 03:50
> An: [log in to unmask]
> Betreff: Finger Direction is Meaningful
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> SignWriting List
> December 1, 2010
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> Regarding finger direction -
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> Finger direction is meaningful - and there are times when it is useful to write a handshape a little on the diagonal, so you can see the fingers projecting down.
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> Sometimes signs can be flexible. They can be understood with the same meaning, whether they are exactly projecting forward, or directed toward the diagonal. In these cases, if the diagonal position is just as acceptable, and the fingers look more like they are pointing in the proper direction, then the symbol can be written on the diagonal or to the side and it is easier to read.
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> In the new book that Adam Frost and I are writing, we have a page at the end of each chapter called "Finger Direction is Meaningful:
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> SignWriting Hand Symbols Manual
> http://www.signwriting.org/archive/docs7/sw0618_SignWriting_Hand_Symbols_Manual_Sutton_Frost.pdf
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> Here is a sample page:
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