Print

Print


I like the pocket, it's how I would write it. You need both lines to show the 
hip.

Charles




________________________________
From: Stefan Wöhrmann <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Tue, January 11, 2011 6:55:18 PM
Subject: AW: AW: AW: SW E-Lesson 0097: Neck and Shoulders

Hi Valerie, 

Yes, I agree - when I read a document, a single Shoulder Line means a
Shoulder, not a Hip ... to write under the Hip  or close to the Hip and to
indicate that the sign is performed pretty low , I always write the Shoulder
Line and the Hip Line ... But ( and that is the reason for my answer I allow
myself some flexible positioning of the two lines in order to feel
comfortable with the "design" of the specific sign... 

What do you think of this spelling of "pocket"   Hosentasche 


Stefan ;-) 



-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: SignWriting List: Read and Write Sign Languages
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] Im Auftrag von Valerie Sutton
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 12. Januar 2011 00:26
An: [log in to unmask]
Betreff: Re: AW: AW: SW E-Lesson 0097: Neck and Shoulders

SignWriting List
January 11, 2011

Yes - when I read a document, a single Shoulder Line means a Shoulder, not a
Hip, since we had that problem back in 1984 and made that rule because our
Deaf newspaper writers were mis-reading each other's writings - so when I
said "strict" I meant that is the rule we follow here... to write under the
Hip, we require both the Shoulder Line and the Hip Line to be written...

How do you write the Hips versus the Shoulders? Do you have some examples
without the Shoulder Line that you feel are read clearly?...I would be happy
to see them -

Val ;-)

-------


On Jan 11, 2011, at 3:07 PM, Stefan Wöhrmann wrote:

> Hi Val, 
> 
> thanks for your answer. Have to smile about your strict rule "... and must
> be written as a unit" ... 
> So if for any purpose I would prefer the two lines one by one you are in
> doubt that you would not know which is to be interpreted as shoulder and
> which is supposed to be the hip? - ha - I bet you would understand -
> definitely!!!! 
> 
> Stefan ;-) 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
> Von: SignWriting List: Read and Write Sign Languages
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] Im Auftrag von Valerie Sutton
> Gesendet: Dienstag, 11. Januar 2011 23:00
> An: [log in to unmask]
> Betreff: Re: AW: SW E-Lesson 0097: Neck and Shoulders
> 
> SignWriting List
> January 11, 2011
> 
> Hello Stefan and everyone...
> Thank you for this response. It is always great to get your
feedback...which
> is excellent...
> 
> Actually in this case, I feel it would be impossible to have that mean a
Hip
> Line, since the rule is, if you want a sign to be close to the Hip Line
you
> must have two lines...one for the Shoulder and one for the Hip, and the
two
> lines for the Shoulder and Hip are close together, and must be written as
a
> unit. Hip and Shoulder Line are one symbol in the ISWA, with a smaller
space
> for the Torso than you see in the compound sign below...
>