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#%$^*
Sorry list. My lovely picture turned into a string of code that nobody
needs to see.
Take Two, I'm trying it as an attachment now.
- Kim from Boston

On Thu, Mar 29, 2012 at 10:10 AM, Kimberley Shaw <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Sure! I'm glad to volunteer an example of real-world handwriting.
> I have a whole folder full of songs which are translated from English or
> Yiddish into ASL. They are written while my ASL-consultant creates an
> on-the-fly interpretation of the song's printed words. I never can write
> quite fast enough to capture "real-time" signing -- wish I could! As is,
> there are a certain amount of against-the-rules shortcuts that I use, which
> are faster to write than the standard version, and make sense to me. (So
> that when the director decides to use a song I and my consultant translated
> 5 years ago, I can still read and understand notes from 5 years ago...)
> There is a constant tension between writing nicely, neatly and properly, and
> writing quickly and more streamlined!
> It is true that standard Signwriting doesn't always flow easily from pen or
> paper. It feels very much like writing in Hebrew when you have to use all
> the diacritics and vowels, versus just writing cursive consonants, as fluent
> Israelis (and Yiddish speakers) do.
> So here's a picture of one song, unedited, unimproved, warts and all.
> Straight from my cellphone. I hope it gets from here to there OK.
>
> Best,
> Kim from Boston
>
>
>>
>>
>>
>> Do you have any samples of letters, or notes, or what-have-you, that
>> are good examples of quickly-written but still-legible(-to-the-author)
>> SignWriting?
>>
>>
>> Sure - anyone want to show Arthaey some of their handwritten notes? smile
>>
>> As far as good examples on the web -
>> http://www.signwriting.org/about/prepare/prep01.html
>>
>> Darline was aghast when I posted this one, because she was just writing
>> handwritten notes for herself and never expected it to become an example
>> that it is possible to write by hand (smile)
>>
>> and here is an article that goes on for more than 6 pages showing lots of
>> handwriting�go from page to page to page...
>> http://www.signwriting.org/lessons/cursive/byhand1.html
>>
>>
>>
>