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SignWriting List
August 22, 2013

Yes, I agree, thank you, Ingvild, for sharing this - This is a good story to remember...Reading appears to be expressive, whether your read out loud, or hear your own voice in silence while you read, or read without hearing anything…it is still expressive, because you are internalizing the thoughts for meaning, as if they are your own - You are not hearing someone else's voice - because there is no way you could know what the original author sounded like, nor is the sound of someone else's voice the point of the message - How someone else signs something (produces the movements) is not the point either, if you are reading for "meaning" - 

Val ;-)

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On Aug 22, 2013, at 2:01 PM, Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Ah, that is an interesting way of thinking about expressive/receptive reading for spoken language!
Thanks Ingvild!


On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 4:17 PM, Ingvild Roald <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
On an off-note: St Augustin, bishop in Hippo, North Africa ca 400, commented astonished that he had heard that some people actually read without using their voice (if I remember my facts correctly. It definitely was someone famous and around that time). So it seems he and most other people who were able read did so expressively ...

Ingvild


Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2013 14:49:25 -0400
From: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: one more receptive/expressive question
To: [log in to unmask]

Thank you Valerie and Cherie for your interesting replies!


On Wed, Aug 21, 2013 at 5:51 PM, Cherie Wren <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
If I can't immediately read a sign, I will try to sign it 'out loud'.  If I am reading receptive, I get all confused, because it doesn't feel right.

cherie



From: Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 9:54 AM

Subject: one more receptive/expressive question

Hi again! Thanks to all who responded to my earlier question - such helpful responses! I'll be sure to keep you all updated about the paper.
I noticed something in your replies that made me think of an additional question: most of you talked about the process of writing and how expressive/receptive affects that process. Do any of you have any thoughts on how the choice affects reading? For example, when you read something written expressively, do you think that it makes you experience the writing differently? Are you more likely to sign it "out loud" (physically perform the signs in whole or in part while signing)? To notice spelling or writing choices that would differ from your own? Does putting yourself in the writer's shoes make you relate to them more?
Thanks!
Erika


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Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Oberlin College





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Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Oberlin College



--
Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Oberlin College