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SignWriting List
September 8, 2013

I think this is a great idea, Erika, and I also hope Maria can possibly include this in her dissertation. I am one of Maria's advisors to her dissertation, and I am reading it now and it is an amazing and detailed work…(thank you, Maria)... So I do not know how much more can be squeezed in now, but nonetheless I want to thank everyone involved - very good discussion - and it does show that any writing system can be applied differently by its writers...

Val ;-)

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On Sep 8, 2013, at 11:25 AM, Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> This is a great discussion - indeed, the kind of thing I was interested in working with for my book project. There have been some very interesting FROG sentences and discussion, but perhaps I can also include a discussion of this elicited sentence as well if no one objects.
> 
> 
> On Sun, Sep 8, 2013 at 12:16 PM, Valerie Sutton <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> SignWriting List
> September 8, 2013
> 
> I like both translations... I think both are valid and readable… in fact the first translation might be better for some readers… a lot depends on the target audience, as was mentioned before...
> 
> Thank you everyone for this discussion...
> 
> Val ;-)
> 
> ------
> 
> 
> On Sep 8, 2013, at 8:43 AM, Charles Butler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> Perfect. Shows parallelism of concepts. 
>>  
>> Charles Butler
>> [log in to unmask]
>> 240-764-5748
>> Clear writing moves business forward.
>> 
>> From: Adam Frost <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: [log in to unmask] 
>> Sent: Sunday, September 8, 2013 11:23 AM
>> Subject: Re: help with writing an ASL sentence for an academic paper
>> 
>> Here is a new translation. I feel that this is better than the one that I had done before.
>> 
>> 	
>> 
>> Glossing of the above sentence:
>> THIS/HERE EXAMPLE SENTENCE, ASL, SIGNWRITING.
>> Translation of the above sentence:
>> 
>> This example sentence is in ASL and SignWriting.
>> The first 3 signs are topicalized because of the brow raising followed by a pause. The last two signs are separated by a pause to signify "and". I did think about wether or not I should place them in left and right lanes, but then decided against it because I am not comparing the two concepts. 
>> You might notice that I completely avoided the use of "written" and "with". Part of it was because it was giving me a struggle in how to translate it, but also because I realized that the sentence was actually making two statements: this is an ASL example and that it was written in SignWriting. When I played with writing two separate sentences, I realized that if I were talking with my friends that I would just say "This is in SignWriting" rather than "This is written in SignWriting", so I went with the idea that the example is in ASL and SignWriting.
>> Adam
>> SignText Options
>> 
>> Courtesy of SignBank.org
>> On Sep 7, 2013, at 4:41 PM, maria galea wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear list members particularly ASL users,
>>> 
>>> A friend of mine who happens to be a linguist in the field of writing systems of the world is hoping to include the mentioning of SignWriting as a writing system of the world, and he has asked if someone could translate the following sentence into ASL SignWriting:
>>> 
>>> "This is an American sign language example written with SignWriting "
>>> 
>>> If you could add sign-to-meaning correspondences, syntactic factors, and lexical selection considerations would be helpful for him.
>>> 
>>> Thank you! It would be great if SignWriting makes its way into the academic field of writing systems, so thank you very much for helping out with this (i can't do it myself, because I'm not an ASL user)
>>> 
>>> best regards to everyone!
>>> maria
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Erika Hoffmann-Dilloway
> Assistant Professor of Anthropology
> Oberlin College