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SignWriting List
May 2, 2019

Yes, thank you, Adam, for the great diagram in the previous messages and it is pasted below I believe too ;-)

Regarding Wrist Circles, in Question #1 below:

Rachel, your English descriptions of S2ed and S2ef are correct.

The darker section of the Wrist Circles shows movement "towards the body or chest". The lighter or skinnier section of the symbol shows movement "away from the body or chest". When the hand is above or below the chest, like in the sky above the head, or on the floor as you say, it is still the same movement, still relating to the same planes in space... The darker section represents the "back part of the circle" and the lighter or skinnier section represents the "forward part of the circle". Everything is based on relating to spatial planes. There are a lot of technical terms we could use, but we tried to stick with forward or back.

So I have answered your question 1 ;-)

I will get to your Number 2 question soon - sorry I am always being pulled away from my computer -

Val ;-)

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On May 1, 2019, at 7:51 AM, <[log in to unmask]> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Adam that’s a great picture and confirms my understanding.  Thank you!
 
Now I have a new question, and since Valerie hasn’t had enough time yet to answer my second question, I will repeat that here as the last question here so you don’t have to go looking through old emails.
  1. Wrist circles

If I extend my arms straight out in front of me and draw a circle with my index finger on the window (the front wall) then the wrist circles are in the front wall plane, and I think I would use a symbol from this set:

My problem is that I am not sure of how to interpret the symbol set for S2ef:

 

If I place my right arm parallel to my chest and circle the wrist so that my finger draws a circle on the left sidewall, would I use the symbols in row 0 to 3?

If I raise my right arm above my head to point to the sky and draw a circle on the sky (or stoop down and draw a circle on the floor), or sign ALWAYS in ASL,  would I use the symbols in rows 4 and 5?  

 
  1. Here is my last question, repeated from my previous email:
 
 
If I want a path that slopes, then I would use one of these symbols:
 
I interpret the first symbol in this set (S2B400) as: 
The hand moves upward and sloped toward the horizon (the path starts low to the ground and rises as it moves away from the signer), while at the same time curving right and left, as though you are watching someone walking away from you up a curving mountain path.
 
Have I interpreted the symbol correctly?
 
 
From: SignWriting List: Read and Write Sign Languages <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Adam Frost
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 11:40 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [SPAM] RE: Questions about signwriting symbols with curving paths on sidewall
Importance: Low
 
Here is a graphical representation of what that symbol mean. ;-)
 
 

Adam


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